Thursday, March 25

How I Wrote 3000 Words in 2 Days

So after I posted my weekend writing count yesterday, I had interest both on my blog and on Twitter about how how I managed to write that much. I wish there was some sort of miracle formula I could tell you guys. But as with most writing stuff, I think it’s more of a personal thing you have to learn for yourself. However, I will share with you guys some of the tricks I use. They don’t always work for me, and can actually sometimes trap me, but for the most part they work.


  • Before I begin a scene, I make a list of things I want achieved within that scene. This includes both feelings/emotions, as well as images, and information. I often keep it in my actual WIP document, and I can delete the points as I go. Although this seems quite basic, it grounds me into the scene. Whereas I could be swept away or even stuck while writing, this list helps me stay focused and gives me a goal to achieve. It also prevents issues from cropping up later—which could happen if you let yourself be completely swept away.

  • My next step is... I take the list I just made and expand it, if need be. For example, there is a scene in my WIP where my Hero is spying on my Heroine. While he’s spying on her, I wanted certain aspects of both her appearance and the setting, to be more prominent in my Hero’s mind. Therefore, I made jot notes about what I wanted. Believe it or not, this really helped me focus on exactly what I needed to write. It only takes me a few minutes to make these lists—I just lay down on my bed and imagine the scene, step by step. If my mind focuses on the black curl of my Heroine’s hair on her shoulder, then I put it in the list—because obviously, my mind thought it was important enough for me to see, therefore it’s important enough for my readers to read/see. This isn't always true, but I find that most of the time it is.

  • Next, I work on the “introduction” to my scene. I’ve been known to painstakingly work on my hooks. However, once I have the right hook, the rest of that “intro” flows. Generally, I spend the most time on my scenes on the intros, since they need to grab the reader’s attention.

  • After that, I work on dialogue. With this, I don’t worry about movement and description when I write it. I put the basics down. By that, I mean I write what the characters are saying, and I put the basic dialogue tag of “Adeena said” or “William said” etc... This is more for me, so that I know exactly who is talking in case I get confused. By doing this, the dialogue flows. It’s not start and stop, but follows natural conversation—which is what you want. It also pumps up your word count in a remarkably short amount of time.

  • Once the basics of my dialogue are down, I read through and fill in the blanks. I put in the movement and the description. By this point, it always flows smoothly for me. I’m not sure why. It may be because so much is already done and the basics are laid down, but either way, it works.

Okay, so that’s all I can think of for writing so much. I hope it helps guys!

Do any of you do these same things?

10 comments:

  1. Good tips! 3k words is awesome. Way to go. :)

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  2. I write to-do lists all the time, but never thought to write one for a scene. What a fab idea! I'm going to give it a try, for sure.

    Thanks for the tip!

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  3. I am definately doing to try this as I get stuck with scenes all the time. I usually don't outline too much as I tend to just go with the flow, but I think at least doing a small outline could help me during those tough times or when I don't have a lot of time to write.

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  4. Congratulations. That's great. Good tips. I can only mad write if I know I have HOURS. If the Monster Baby is at her grandmother's or something.

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  5. Woo-hoo on 3000 words!!! Lately I've been on a roll at least 2-3K a day... I'm now up to 64K and slowly closing out my first draft and loving it!!!

    I have an award for you over on my blog!!! Check it out when you get a chance :)

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  6. Good job on the words, and excellent tips. My process is totally different, but that's what makes life fun. I just sit down - sometimes with the thought of where I want the story to go and sometimes not - and start typing. I write until the ideas run out or until my hands cramp (whichever comes first). Sometimes I end up with pearls and sometimes I find pages of crap the next day. :shrug: But it works for me. =o)

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  7. Great list. I actually did a broad list of my writing process on my blog yesterday. I guess we were on the same wavelength. :)

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  8. GREAT tips, Nat! You're a writing machine, girl! I'm going to put my writing cap on this weekend too. I have 10,000 words to write and only about 3 days to do it. *bites nails*

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  9. You certainly have a good routine going. Happy Scribbling!

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  10. Karen- Thanks =)

    Jennifer- Yay, glad to help out!!

    Harley- Woohoo, Im glad I gave you the idea =) I'm a panster for the most part, especially when it comes to the novel as a whole. However, for scenes, I do try to outline them before I actually start writing.

    Piedmont Writer- Thank you! Oh me too. I dont understand people who say "write when you have 5 minutes." Bah. Load of BS in my opinion.

    Jen- Yeah, oops it was 4000. Oh well, lol. I was getting sick when I wrote the post. Woohoo on your word count.

    B.E.- Thanks =) Yeah, I thought a lot of people would write how I do... I thought about not doing this post because I figured it would be a boring repeat for most. *shrugs* It's interesting how different we all are in terms of style.

    Candice- Haha, I guess so =)

    Julie- Thanks hun! *whistles* That's a lot to do... But I know you can do it =D If you need someone to yell at you every hour or so to get your butt in gear, I'll email you? nataliemurphy@live.ca

    Glynis- Yep =) Thank you and you too!

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